Many of the most famous comic book heroes around today emphasize a more science-based, technological, or intense-training back story, but some of the most popular are drawn from myths written thousands of years ago. These range from the great ancient Greek gods to the fantastical creatures of the ancient Egyptians.

Now, these beings of myth are being given a second run in popular culture, shifting from featuring in life lessons and tales to figures of entertainment. One of the more striking examples of this comes in the form of a bingo room that’s risen to prominence by putting famous mythological figures front and center.

Age of the Gods Bingo delivers on the interest for ancient myth

Bingo isn’t a game that you’d usually associate with a theme like mythological gods, but at https://bingo.paddypower.com/, Age of the Gods Bingo is proving that all pop-culture fans seek out these beings. In the game, within the Arena of the Gods feature, Zeus, Hades, Athena, and Ares all give out awards when triggered, adding another tier to the 90-ball bingo variant.

Detaching the classic lottery game from its standard form seems a bit odd, given its popularity. Yet, because the developers decided to infuse the instantly recognizable figures created thousands of years ago in ancient Greece, Age of the Gods Bingo was successful. The fact that bingo rooms are all very communal and welcoming only helps to keep the game rolling.

Mythologies being drawn into comics

The biggest names in superhero comics are likely Batman, Spider-Man, Superman, Wolverine, Captain America, and probably Iron Man. While they all have fantastical powers, abilities, and capabilities, none of them are beings of myth. However, that changes a bit further down, particularly with Thor, from Norse mythology, and especially with enemies and monsters.

The list at https://www.cbr.com/ showcases this in Marvel comics alone, with the Hydra, Cerberus, Cyclops, and the Minotaur all being pulled in from Greek myths. Then, there are also the creatures of European folklore, like vampires and werewolves. This is also the case in DC, using the characters of Ares (a son of Zeus), Hippolyta (queen of the Amazonians), Hades, and Apollo.

Anyone who’s ever read the tales from the ancient Greek, Egyptian, Celtic, or Norse mythologies will know that they are rich in fantastical events and larger-than-life beings and creatures. Acient mythologies, however, were used as a tool for the people of the age to explain the world around them. Nowadays, we have a rather good grip on how our world works, and so, such fantastic characters become entertainment.

However, even in the form of an entertainment section that continues to be a part of pop culture, superheroes replicate a similar reflection as the mythologies of old. As noted by https://www.theguardian.com/, pop culture gives the temperature and a point of identification within the contemporary space, with them often shunned by society for causing damage, or at a base level, offering pure escapism in familiar settings during confusing times in the world.

Mythological beings make for superb characters in entertainment, from bingo to comics, because they’re identifiable, fantastical beings with a tremendous amount of lore already written. Furthermore, they fit into our modern mythos, even if superheroes aren’t used in the exact same way as tales of gods and monsters.

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Many of the most famous comic book heroes around today emphasize a more science-based, technological, or intense-training back story, but some of the most popular are drawn from myths written thousands of years ago. These range from the great ancient Greek gods to the fantastical creatures of the ancient...