Essays are only insightful if they have a particular message to impart. This is what makes comic books such as powerful storytelling tools. They use colorful art to deliver philosophical messages in a welcoming format.

And if you were ever tasked with producing a meaningful college essay based on the messages hidden within comic books, you would be spoiled for choice, you may want to consider to buy college paper as well. Just consider the following comic book series:

1). The Killing Joke by Alan Moore

Batman and The Joker are intimately intertwined. They have spent the last couple of decades fighting one another, and The Joker has become as integral to DC Comics as The Batman.

Many a memorable story has been told about these two titans, and yet none is more impactful than The Killing Joke. The book picks up with the Joker committing a senseless act of violence and driving Bruce Wayne to new depths of desperation.

The volume shows how a normal man could lose his way, pushed by the most unexpected of circumstances to don the persona of a serial killer. It presents The Joker in a light typically reserved for America’s most notorious serial killers.

2). The Wicked + The Divine by Kieron Gillen

In this beautifully illustrated novel, a dozen human beings are chosen to host the reincarnated powers and personalities of twelve deities. For two years, they are given free rein to utilize their newfound divinity.

But then they must die, paving the way for a new reincarnation cycle to begin. Following the trials of a teenager who must come to terms with her integral position in the new pantheon, The Wicked + The Divine is the perfect answer to people who think that comic books have nothing of importance to say.

This series delves far deeper into the concepts of sexuality and ethnicity than any other mainstream comic book you have ever read. It has a take on every hot button issue of the 21st Century.

3). Watchmen by Alan Moore

Watchmen is to comic books what Game of Thrones is to Fantasy. The series is a gritty exploration of the brutal realities of life as a superhero. The story it tells begins with the vicious murder of an unhinged hero and then it follows the attempts his friends and acquaintances make to find his killer.

Watchmen is perfect for readers that shun comic books but love introspective literature. There is enough symbolism in the series to fill several dozen essays. Alan Moor doesn’t write superheroes. He writes real people some of whom just so happen to wear colorful tights.

4). Sandman by Neil Gaiman

Sandman from Vertigo/DC is a darling of the 80s. While so many masterfully written comic books have volumes to say about contemporary life, Sandman is commended more for its complex narrative than anything else.

The series takes larger-than-life characters and gives them a tangible relatability that is missing in so many comics. Sandman is the perfect subject matter for any individual looking to understand the most effective means of distilling mind-bending concepts into easily consumable literary portions.

5). Preacher by Garth Ennis

Garth Ennis’ hero is Jesse Custer, a small town preacher who becomes the host of a creature called Genesis. Suddenly granted incredible power, Jesse embarks on a journey to find God.

Preacher is blasphemous on so many levels. And that is what makes it so appealing to explore. The comic uses sex and violence to make some rather brazen statements about people, religion, and society.

6). God Loves, Man Kills (X-Men) by Chris Claremont

The X-Men comics have always been topical, with the hate mutants attract acting as a stand-in for race relations in the United States. od Loves, Man Kills’ takes that concept and pushes it even further.

The book followers William Stryker, a mutant-hating fanatic who decides to wage what he considers to be a Holy War on Mutants.

The story is quite visceral in the approach it takes as it tries to unravel the root of hate and discrimination. The fantastical elements do not make the message it delivers any less poignant.

7). All-Star Superman by Grant Morrison

People often dismiss All-Star Superman because the book doesn’t attempt to make any sweeping statements about life and society.

And, in a way, All-Star Superman can’t quite compare to the likes of Watchmen. However, that doesn’t dilute the comic’s quality.

All-Star Superman is a love letter to superheroes. It shows Superman at his best and brightest and it brings to bear all the hopes, dreams, and ideals that make comic books so popular.

If you were ever tasked with trying to explain what makes superheroes so appealing to readers both young and old, you wouldn’t need to look any further than All-Star Superman.

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Essays are only insightful if they have a particular message to impart. This is what makes comic books such as powerful storytelling tools. They use colorful art to deliver philosophical messages in a welcoming format. And if you were ever tasked with producing a meaningful college essay based on the...